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Toni Twiss

Who is Toni Twiss?

Toni Twiss is a former English and Media Studies teacher.  She now works as a director of eLearning and ICT PD facilitator at two secondary schools in Hamilton, New Zealand and is available to consult with schools.  She is an Apple Distinguished Educator, recipient of a Wolfe Fisher funded place on the Excelerator Future Leaders Programme and in 2008 was awarded a New Zealand Ministry of Education eFellowship.

Being a Ministry of Education eFellow, released Toni from classroom teaching for a year to allow her to research the potential for the use of mobile phones in the classroom.  Toni’s research was further supported by Vodafone New Zealand who supplied a class-set of 3G mobile phones and unlimited calls, text and mobile data.  While her research looked at tools and techniques for using mobile phones in the classroom, it went on to consider information literacy, and the impact, of students having on-demand access to information in their pockets through using their mobile phones to access the internet.  A copy of this research is available here: toni-twiss-ubiquitous-information.

3 Comments »

  • Malcolm Law said:

    I am pleased to see your blog as it is a valuable resource for teachers interested in the potential of mobile technologies in teaching. I invite you to visit my blog and see what I have said on the subject.

  • Paula farrell said:

    Hi our school is starting a pilot program where teachers can apply for an ipod touch to use in their classroom. We need to sub,it ways we think we could use them, I am interested as I don’t want to get left behind in technology, but really have no idea! I teach middle school ( 14 year old boys) english, history, geography and religion. I also teach year 9 commerce. Could you please help me with some ideas? My email is’
    PNFarrell@riverview.nsw.edu.au

    Thank you in advance for your time,
    Paula farrell

  • Dallas Knight said:

    I really enjoyed reading your research. The rise and rise of mobile technologies worldwide, especially in developing countries may reduce inequities for those unable to access personal computers. I am enjoying exploring the use of mobile technologies in midwifery service delivery.